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Inter Milan Possession Game

[from @ultimateplayerHQ]

  • four squares, maybe 5 x 5 or 10 x 10 (depending on level), each with a mini-goal at the back and in a total 20 x 20 or 30 x 30 grid
  • each square has a player that is restricted to that square; these players work together to maintain possession
  • one player in the middle who has unrestricted movement; this player is trying to win possession
  • if / when the player in the middle wins possession, he attacks the nearest goal / square and tries to score
  • if he scores, he switches with that player [my addition]; if he does not, play resumes
  • progressions:
    • more defenders [great, I suspect, for working on 1st and 2nd defender]
    • limit touches
    • change spacing of zones

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 

The Importance of Positional Discipline [Annotated Video]

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 

To Backpedal Or Not – David Villa’s 50 yd Goal Against Philly

By all means, admire the goal. But it’s posted here for the keeper’s footwork. When Villa first takes the shot, the keeper does the correct thing: he turns his hips (the dropstep), and runs while keeping his eye on the ball. Perhaps inexplicably, however, within a few yards of the goal, he (re)squares his hips and backpedals. When he makes a play for the ball, then, he jumps with his calves (because of the backpedal) rather than with his quads (which he would have / could have from the dropstep; and, of course, the quads are much bigger than the calves and are the muscles that generate jumping power).

I suspect, after watching it a few times, that he resquares his hips because he anticipates catching it, i.e. he squares to the ball so he can catch it facing forward, exactly what he should have done. Whether because of misjudgment, however, or a sudden gust of wind, the ball carries farther than he anticipates and he is no longer positioned to catch it. He makes a somewhat feeble attempt at parrying it (better, to be honest, than expected, given that he jumps from his calves), but is now out of position, and the ball finds its way under the bar.

If he had continued running the way he first did, I suspect he would have been able to parry it successfully: worst case scenario is a corner kick. But by resquaring his hips, whether well-intended or not, he makes it difficult (and in this case impossible) for him to catch the ball and prevent the goal.

Take a look for yourself and see what you think.

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 
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Posted by on April 14, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

Coaching with Video – Hudl Technique

(This preamble will be repeated for each app entry.)

I’ve been meaning to try various video resources for the iPad and my first club game tomorrow has been the push I need. Our home games are at Worcester’s Foley Field, which means there are big enough bleachers that I can get the height I want for video.

These apps tend to be similar in the basics: recording, annotating, slow motion. It will be in the details, I suspect, where they distinguish themselves. They tend, however, to be designed to focus on individual and skill analysis and, while I will use them for that, right now I’m looking at them for game video.

My son had some friends over and they were playing basketball in the driveway, so I set up the iPad on the tripod and just let it go. (I had bought an iPad mount for the tripod last week from Amazon.) I first wanted to see if there were any limits to the length of the video; my goal was to capture between 15 and 20 minutes per app (I figured if it would take that much, then there was no limit).

These are the apps that I tried:

  • Hudl Technique
  • Coach My Video
  • Up My Game (the only one with video-length-limit)
  • Coach’s Eye

I’ll talk about Hudl Technique here and include the others in subsequent posts.

Here is the functionality of Hudl Technique:

Annotation Tools

Screen Shot 2017-04-08 at 9.53.33 PM

Comparison Tools (you can run the video you shot against another video, either another one you shot or a professional)

Screen Shot 2017-04-08 at 9.54.31 PM

Sharing and General Editing Tools

Screen Shot 2017-04-08 at 9.55.10 PM

The feature, though, that I was most impressed with is the scroll wheel at the bottom (the vertical dashes). This is a manual fast forward and rewind that allows you go back and forth at manual speed. It can apply to game video in that it allows repeated and close analysis of plays and of course it applies to individual skill as it allows focused attention on details.

The video below illustrates the slow motion and the scroll wheel.

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 
 

Toca Football / Small Ball Training

Saw an ad for this company on a Soccer America email and checked it out. Interesting. Basically a jugs machine with a feeder with some added features (and I don’t say that to undercut its functionality but merely to provide context).

Screen Shot 2017-04-05 at 8.25.05 AM

Some added features of course are the feeder but also that it can be programmed and controlled via an iOS app (seems not Android; it specifically says iOS), in addition to a wide range of angles and speeds. For the full description, and some good graphics, of its capabilities, see here.

From a coaching standpoint, however, I’m probably (read: definitely) not going to foot the $8500 bill for one. But the site focuses on the advantages of small-ball-training. Eddie Lewis, the former USMNT player, founded the company after training with tennis balls in college to improve his first touch and buying a tennis ball feeder to make more efficient that training method.

Toca then seems to be not only selling a piece of equipment but also a training philosophy, that of small-ball-training to improve first touch. The Toca balls are smaller than a traditional ball.

Screen Shot 2017-04-05 at 8.29.17 AM

And Toca seems to market not only the trainer itself but also the idea of training centers, ‘staffed’ with a number of the trainers for use by teams or personal coaches.

An interesting both business model and approach to training, technology-independent.

 

Attacking with Depth

[from coachestrainingroom.com]

  • a 3 v 3 + 3 (or similar, based on numbers)
  • the 3 v 3 plays in the 18 to goal
  • the +3 start with the ball above the 18
  • the +3 pass to find seams for service or in the defense
  • the 3 v 3 move and attack from the entry pass of the +3
  • the 3 v 3 can pass back to the +3
  • the defense can’t defend the +3

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.