RSS

Category Archives: Video

Staying Light on your Feet

I, as I’m sure many coaches do, constantly am reminding my players about not being flat-footed, about staying light on their foot and keeping them moving. Saw this from the warm-ups of the Italy – San Marino game and thought it was a great illustration of what we mean when we tell players to stay light on their feet and to keep their feet moving. So many players misunderstand why we advocate for that but this video does a nice job illustrating how much more lively play is, even in the simplest of warm-ups, when they’re not flat-footed.

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Advertisements
 
 

Inter Milan Possession Game

[from @ultimateplayerHQ]

  • four squares, maybe 5 x 5 or 10 x 10 (depending on level), each with a mini-goal at the back and in a total 20 x 20 or 30 x 30 grid
  • each square has a player that is restricted to that square; these players work together to maintain possession
  • one player in the middle who has unrestricted movement; this player is trying to win possession
  • if / when the player in the middle wins possession, he attacks the nearest goal / square and tries to score
  • if he scores, he switches with that player [my addition]; if he does not, play resumes
  • progressions:
    • more defenders [great, I suspect, for working on 1st and 2nd defender]
    • limit touches
    • change spacing of zones

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 

To Backpedal Or Not – David Villa’s 50 yd Goal Against Philly

By all means, admire the goal. But it’s posted here for the keeper’s footwork. When Villa first takes the shot, the keeper does the correct thing: he turns his hips (the dropstep), and runs while keeping his eye on the ball. Perhaps inexplicably, however, within a few yards of the goal, he (re)squares his hips and backpedals. When he makes a play for the ball, then, he jumps with his calves (because of the backpedal) rather than with his quads (which he would have / could have from the dropstep; and, of course, the quads are much bigger than the calves and are the muscles that generate jumping power).

I suspect, after watching it a few times, that he resquares his hips because he anticipates catching it, i.e. he squares to the ball so he can catch it facing forward, exactly what he should have done. Whether because of misjudgment, however, or a sudden gust of wind, the ball carries farther than he anticipates and he is no longer positioned to catch it. He makes a somewhat feeble attempt at parrying it (better, to be honest, than expected, given that he jumps from his calves), but is now out of position, and the ball finds its way under the bar.

If he had continued running the way he first did, I suspect he would have been able to parry it successfully: worst case scenario is a corner kick. But by resquaring his hips, whether well-intended or not, he makes it difficult (and in this case impossible) for him to catch the ball and prevent the goal.

Take a look for yourself and see what you think.

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 

Coaching with Video – Hudl Technique

(This preamble will be repeated for each app entry.)

I’ve been meaning to try various video resources for the iPad and my first club game tomorrow has been the push I need. Our home games are at Worcester’s Foley Field, which means there are big enough bleachers that I can get the height I want for video.

These apps tend to be similar in the basics: recording, annotating, slow motion. It will be in the details, I suspect, where they distinguish themselves. They tend, however, to be designed to focus on individual and skill analysis and, while I will use them for that, right now I’m looking at them for game video.

My son had some friends over and they were playing basketball in the driveway, so I set up the iPad on the tripod and just let it go. (I had bought an iPad mount for the tripod last week from Amazon.) I first wanted to see if there were any limits to the length of the video; my goal was to capture between 15 and 20 minutes per app (I figured if it would take that much, then there was no limit).

These are the apps that I tried:

  • Hudl Technique
  • Coach My Video
  • Up My Game (the only one with video-length-limit)
  • Coach’s Eye

I’ll talk about Hudl Technique here and include the others in subsequent posts.

Here is the functionality of Hudl Technique:

Annotation Tools

Screen Shot 2017-04-08 at 9.53.33 PM

Comparison Tools (you can run the video you shot against another video, either another one you shot or a professional)

Screen Shot 2017-04-08 at 9.54.31 PM

Sharing and General Editing Tools

Screen Shot 2017-04-08 at 9.55.10 PM

The feature, though, that I was most impressed with is the scroll wheel at the bottom (the vertical dashes). This is a manual fast forward and rewind that allows you go back and forth at manual speed. It can apply to game video in that it allows repeated and close analysis of plays and of course it applies to individual skill as it allows focused attention on details.

The video below illustrates the slow motion and the scroll wheel.

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 
 

Boston Breakers Testing / Diagnostics

Saw this on the Boston Breakers Snapchat and thought it was a kind of cool glimpse behind the curtain, so to speak. Things that we all do on some level, but certainly most of us without that kind of athleticism or equipment (for the record, here’s the company that sells those automatic timers: Fusion Sport; and here’s the specific equipment (they were using the Pro version)).

I wasn’t sure how to capture it, though, but ran across the answer to that very question on iphoneinformer.com, and wrote up the instructions with some screenshots on my Tech-in-Ed blog here.

And here’s the video / captured snapchat:

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 

Master Set Piece Theater?

Thank you, Total Soccer Show, for the name / title. I’m 90% sure this was planned, but there are a few variables that I’m not sure about: the dummy runner looks like she’s expecting, or at least wants, the ball (maybe the taker has two options, depending on how she reads the play); if not for the shooter’s first touch, and a (very) near miss from the defender, the shot never would have made it through: does it seem too low percentage to be planned? In any case, a pretty play, intentional or not.

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 

Volley Technique (Video)

(Realized too late that I hadn’t recorded the sound for the video; apologies about that.)

This clip is from the US v New Zealand friendly last night (10-11-16).

I realize too that there are plenty of good volleys out there but I just happened to grab this from the US Soccer highlight reel. (And a great save by the keeper.)

Interesting to note too that he doesn’t follow through all the way. I suspect that is because he’s a bit behind the ball (you’ll notice that his knee isn’t over the ball); by not following through, he keeps the ball low. A full follow through there, I suspect, would have skied the ball.

 

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.