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Category Archives: Passing Weight

Passing Warm-up

[from thecoachingmanual.com]

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 10.06.55 AMScreen Shot 2017-04-20 at 10.07.03 AM

 

Attacking with Depth

[from coachestrainingroom.com]

  • a 3 v 3 + 3 (or similar, based on numbers)
  • the 3 v 3 plays in the 18 to goal
  • the +3 start with the ball above the 18
  • the +3 pass to find seams for service or in the defense
  • the 3 v 3 move and attack from the entry pass of the +3
  • the 3 v 3 can pass back to the +3
  • the defense can’t defend the +3

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 

Sigi Schmid – Developing Players Technically [SCCC 17] – Combination Play Warm-up

    • A series of progressions based on a Y-formation of cones
    • Passes should be made first touch if possible but two touch if necessary. Ok to take a touch to get the ball under control but shouldn’t take unnecessary touches.

This one begins with following the pass and moving the ball upfield.

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

This next one adds in a drop-off (#2) before moving the ball upfield.

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

This next one adds in further combinations, a bigger drop-off (#6) and a run and pass to space (#s 7 & 8).

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

And this last one removes the drop-off for instead a lateral pass (dropped off at an angle rather than a square pass) before the run and pass to space.

  • Body positioning is important: focus on being in position to deliver the next pass quickly and effectively without giving up positioning on the field – with #6 above, that run should be angled backwards rather than square not only to better set up the pass but also to allow the receiver to get back on defense if the pass is intercepted. If that pass is square, it becomes much more difficult for the receiver to get back on defense.
  • These can also be used for conditioning, seeing how many can be done in a given amount of time.
 

Chris Gbandi – Transition from Defending to Attacking – 2 v 2 + 3 v 3

  • 2 v 2 in a small box with defending team starting with the ball
  • When attacking team wins the ball in the box, it plays out of the box to its team on the outfield
  • The game is then live
  • Progression
  • Shift the square / 2 v 2 to a corner (rather than centered) and focus on switching the field as the team builds out of the back

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 

Chris Gbandi – Transition from Defending to Attacking – Passing Patterns

  • Most goals happen within six passes or fewer
  • Focus on moving the ball quickly out of the back to start the attack

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 

Dick Bate – Possession Play Elements [SCCC 17] – Quick-Passing Game

  • Graphic above isn’t exactly what he did (but has its own merits)
  • He showed a 5 v 5 + 2 with a keeper in the middle zone
  • +2 are always playing for the team in the possession
  • Keeper handles balls played into the middle and (re)distributes
  • Progression
  • Keeper out of the middle
  • Middle becomes a basketball ‘lane’: players only allowed in it for 3 seconds
  • Ball does not need to be played into the middle every time, but player cannot be there for more than 3 seconds
  • [point awarded for every successful combination in the middle?]
 

Dick Bate – Possession Play Elements [SCCC 17] – 1 and 2 Touch Passing

  • 84% of EPL passes are 1 or 2 touch
  • Average time of possession in the EPL or 2 seconds or less
  • Focus must be on developing this sense of quick passing play

  • Begin with a no pressure introduction to 1 and 2 touch passing
  • Passing around 1 and 2 touch with a support player (I’ll be honest; I didn’t quite understand the purpose of or difference between the others of the support player)
  • Emphasize body position, especially with 1 touch, so that receivers are positioned to make a good one touch pass and that pass stays low
  • Your first touch should be fast; your second touch (the pass) should be tight (quick release); these are both designed to minimize the time with the ball and to maximize the effectiveness of what is done with the ball
  • Progression
  • Move two of the five players wide with three remaining in the middle
  • The three move the ball in the same way, passing eventually to one of the wide players
  • The wide player then makes a long pass to the other wide player who distributes to the three in the middle
  • Eventually add in too that the wide player, after that pass, switches with one of the three middle players