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Category Archives: Footwork

Juggling / Skill Contest

UNC Women’s Soccer Twitter feed posted this. Probably a bit above the skill level of my players, but a fun thing to try, perhaps.

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Screen Shot 2017-09-26 at 7.12.44 AM

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Staying Light on your Feet

I, as I’m sure many coaches do, constantly am reminding my players about not being flat-footed, about staying light on their foot and keeping them moving. Saw this from the warm-ups of the Italy – San Marino game and thought it was a great illustration of what we mean when we tell players to stay light on their feet and to keep their feet moving. So many players misunderstand why we advocate for that but this video does a nice job illustrating how much more lively play is, even in the simplest of warm-ups, when they’re not flat-footed.

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 
 

To Backpedal Or Not – David Villa’s 50 yd Goal Against Philly

By all means, admire the goal. But it’s posted here for the keeper’s footwork. When Villa first takes the shot, the keeper does the correct thing: he turns his hips (the dropstep), and runs while keeping his eye on the ball. Perhaps inexplicably, however, within a few yards of the goal, he (re)squares his hips and backpedals. When he makes a play for the ball, then, he jumps with his calves (because of the backpedal) rather than with his quads (which he would have / could have from the dropstep; and, of course, the quads are much bigger than the calves and are the muscles that generate jumping power).

I suspect, after watching it a few times, that he resquares his hips because he anticipates catching it, i.e. he squares to the ball so he can catch it facing forward, exactly what he should have done. Whether because of misjudgment, however, or a sudden gust of wind, the ball carries farther than he anticipates and he is no longer positioned to catch it. He makes a somewhat feeble attempt at parrying it (better, to be honest, than expected, given that he jumps from his calves), but is now out of position, and the ball finds its way under the bar.

If he had continued running the way he first did, I suspect he would have been able to parry it successfully: worst case scenario is a corner kick. But by resquaring his hips, whether well-intended or not, he makes it difficult (and in this case impossible) for him to catch the ball and prevent the goal.

Take a look for yourself and see what you think.

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

 

First Touch Drill

[from Coerver]

The number of players on the outside of course can be adjusted; I might add in a weak foot round; and goalies can collect and distribute in the middle with a focus on good form.

 
 

Tom Goodman – Coaching Attack and Defense [SCCC 17] – Juggling Game

  • Players work in groups of 3
  • Coach calls out a number combination, e.g. 2-1
  • Server throws the ball up
  • First player has 2 touches to get it to 2nd player
  • Second player has 1 touch to get it back to server
  • Numbers can and should be varied
  • Should start with higher numbers to begin with and get progressively more difficult
 

Dick Bate – Man-marking Defending – Movement-Specific Conditioning

  • 3 players, 2 with balls in their hands 5 yards apart, 1 in the middle
  • The one in the middle moves between the two holders, touching the ball with his hand
  • Ball should be moved up and down by holders to vary position
  • Focus on quick movements, turning the hips, and strong first steps
  • Should not be shuffling, but turning and moving
  • 2 end players can shift their position to surprise the middle player: shift from side to side, from front to back, so that the player has to react to where the ball is quickly

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

  • [could this be done as almost a beep-test kind of thing, or at least a timed activity to see how many touches a player can get in a fixed time?]
  • [this could also be done with four holders in a diamond with the middle player either moving a pattern or with the coach calling out numbers to get them to move randomly]
  • Players do quick feet (‘dance’)
  • Coach calls out left or right
  • Players turn in that direction, focusing on hips and first step
  • Players run to a fixed point (sprint of 10 or 15 ¬†yards)

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

  • Initially attacking players ran too fast
  • Bate slowed them down, telling them to jog or even walk; focus on the change of speed
  • Focus is on the defenders, so defenders need to develop that quick first step to keep up with attackers as they change pace
  • Bate added the restriction that only one change of direction was allowed
  • Similar to the catch-the-defender game we already play (with a ball) but in this version no ball; a game of tag
  • Progression: two players have a ball in their hand; they are immune but can and should pass the ball to other players in trouble (this also develops communication)
 

Dave Hancock – What I Learned About Constructing a Training Session from my Days with Jose Mourinho – The Star Pattern

  • Hancock focuses on the Star Pattern because it is both consistent and flexible and, more important perhaps, because it focuses on game-specific movements: cutting, change of direction, short sprinting
  • Warm-up
  • Stations of different patterns
  • Passing through the star
  • Dribbling through the star: balls in a triangle in the middle, dribble to triangle, stop ball, get another, dribble to another point, turn, and repeat
  • Dribbling around defenders: similar to above, replace triangle with dummies; dribble to dummies and turn / ‘beat’ them through the star

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.