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Coaching with Video – Hudl Technique

09 Apr

(This preamble will be repeated for each app entry.)

I’ve been meaning to try various video resources for the iPad and my first club game tomorrow has been the push I need. Our home games are at Worcester’s Foley Field, which means there are big enough bleachers that I can get the height I want for video.

These apps tend to be similar in the basics: recording, annotating, slow motion. It will be in the details, I suspect, where they distinguish themselves. They tend, however, to be designed to focus on individual and skill analysis and, while I will use them for that, right now I’m looking at them for game video.

My son had some friends over and they were playing basketball in the driveway, so I set up the iPad on the tripod and just let it go. (I had bought an iPad mount for the tripod last week from Amazon.) I first wanted to see if there were any limits to the length of the video; my goal was to capture between 15 and 20 minutes per app (I figured if it would take that much, then there was no limit).

These are the apps that I tried:

  • Hudl Technique
  • Coach My Video
  • Up My Game (the only one with video-length-limit)
  • Coach’s Eye

I’ll talk about Hudl Technique here and include the others in subsequent posts.

Here is the functionality of Hudl Technique:

Annotation Tools

Screen Shot 2017-04-08 at 9.53.33 PM

Comparison Tools (you can run the video you shot against another video, either another one you shot or a professional)

Screen Shot 2017-04-08 at 9.54.31 PM

Sharing and General Editing Tools

Screen Shot 2017-04-08 at 9.55.10 PM

The feature, though, that I was most impressed with is the scroll wheel at the bottom (the vertical dashes). This is a manual fast forward and rewind that allows you go back and forth at manual speed. It can apply to game video in that it allows repeated and close analysis of plays and of course it applies to individual skill as it allows focused attention on details.

The video below illustrates the slow motion and the scroll wheel.

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

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